High medical bills driving some Americans to extreme measures - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

High medical bills driving some Americans to extreme measures

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FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Insured Americans with serious medical conditions say the financial stress of rising out-of-pocket health care costs is forcing them to juggle household budgets, delay or skimp on care and even run up credit cards or dodge debt collectors, a new study reveals.

The report, published in the January/February issue of the journal Annals of Family Medicine, provides a snapshot of "life disruptions" people experience as a result of their medical expenses and the sometimes extreme measures they take to keep their heads above water.

One study participant was prescribed a drug to alleviate nausea and vomiting caused by his cancer chemotherapy. Insurance picked up $900 of the $1,200 cost, but he could not even afford the co-payment and went without the medicine. "I said, you know what, I'd rather be sick," he told researchers.

Another paid all her bills but relegated her grocery budget to "whatever's left."

"Sadly, our experience with thousands of patients over the last decade has shown us that many of them have to make heartbreaking decisions about following doctors' orders or putting food on the table for themselves or their families," said Sarah Di Troia, chief operating officer of Health Leads, a Boston-based organization that works with hospitals and clinics to connect patients to basic resources.

David Lipschutz, policy attorney for the Center for Medicare Advocacy in Washington, D.C., said the study is important, timely and "reinforces a lot of the other literature out there" examining the effects of out-of-pocket spending.

Medicare has considerable cost-sharing requirements, and many people who have Medicare "simply don't earn the income in order to afford it," Lipschutz added.

Consider this: Half of the nation's Medicare beneficiaries live on less than $22,000 a year, and 45 percent have three or more chronic conditions, according to data compiled by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Medicare beneficiaries spent a median of more than $3,100 of their own money on health expenses in 2007, the most recent comprehensive data, according to the AARP's Public Policy Institute. Four million beneficiaries, or 10 percent of the Medicare population, shelled out much more. Their out-of-pocket spending topped $7,800.

With health care costs outpacing income growth, study lead author Dr. David Grande, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, wanted to know how families are coping financially.

"My sense is that we focus so much on whether people are covered or not, which is extremely important, we forget how important it is that the coverage is adequate," he said.

For the study, researchers interviewed 33 insured, chronically ill adults who were applying for financial assistance at a nonprofit foundation to help pay for their treatment costs. People were asked about illness-related financial challenges and their impact on housing, food, utilities, savings, borrowing and health expenses. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded for analysis.

Most of the study participants had Medicare, while the rest had employer coverage or temporary group coverage under COBRA. One had Medicaid.

About 85 percent of patients had annual incomes of $40,000 or less, and more than a third of those people lived on $20,000 or less.

Gaps in coverage, particularly Medicare's "doughnut hole" in prescription drug coverage, and benefit designs that make spending from month to month unpredictable, were among the key disruptions that study participants cited.

To pay medical bills, some people described compromises in housing and transportation