FDA should work to cut sugar levels in sodas - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

FDA should work to cut sugar levels in sodas

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WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A leading consumer advocacy group, along with nutrition experts and health agencies from a number of U.S. cities, are calling for lowering the amount of sugars added to soft drinks.

Led by the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), the group on Wednesday sent a petition to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration asking the agency to determine safe levels of high-fructose corn syrup and other sugars in sodas and assorted soft drinks.

Currently, the average 20-ounce bottle of soda contains about 16 teaspoons of sugars made from high-fructose corn syrup, the CSPI said. The American Heart Association currently recommends that men consume no more than 9 teaspoons of added sugars daily, and women no more than 6 teaspoons' worth.

Some 14 million Americans of all ages now get more than one-third of their calories from added sugars, the petition stated.

"The consumption of such high amounts of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup [in sodas] are causing serious health problems, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, among others," said CSPI Executive Director Michael Jacobson.

There's been a great deal of scientific evidence gathered over the past decade to support that link to health problems, he said, and "we're contending that much of the evidence centers around beverages." The CSPI believes most sugary sodas could be safely replaced by those made with low-calorie sweeteners.

The group said its petition has the support of public health departments in Baltimore; Boston; Los Angeles; Philadelphia; Seattle; Portland, Ore.; and other cities, as well as leading academics at Harvard and Yale universities and other institutions around the country.

According to Jacobson, the FDA is legally bound to examine the health effects of the amount of sugar being consumed and take corrective action.

The center is first asking the FDA to determine the safe level of sugar in drinks. Also, it wants the FDA to issue targets for the sugar content of other sugary foods and urge industry to voluntarily reduce sugar levels in those foods, Jacobson said.

"The third thing is to educate consumers to choose healthier foods and beverages," he said.

The FDA classifies high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose and other sugars as "generally recognized as safe," Jacobson said.

"What we're asking the FDA to do is to modify those regulations and set some limits in beverages," he said.

In the 1980s, the FDA twice committed to looking at limiting sugar levels in foods if new scientific evidence found sugar levels were harmful to the public, or if sugar consumption rose, Jacobson said.

"We are reminding the FDA of that and saying you have an obligation to revisit this and protect the public's health," he said.

It will take years before any action is taken, but that gives industry time to adjust to using less sugar in drinks, Jacobson said.

Jacobson said economic issues shouldn't be part of the FDA's consideration