Marshall prof to study rattlesnake species - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

Marshall prof to study rattlesnake species

Posted: Updated:
  • EducationMore>>

  • Caridi spends a lifetime calling the Mountaineers

    Caridi spends a lifetime calling the Mountaineers

    Sunday, July 27 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-27 19:00:23 GMT
    This year’s college freshmen have never heard another play-by-play announcer for West Virginia University. All of their lives, Tony Caridi has been calling Mountaineer football and men’s basketball games on the radio.
    This year’s college freshmen have never heard another play-by-play announcer for West Virginia University. All of their lives, Tony Caridi has been calling Mountaineer football and men’s basketball games on the radio.
  • ‘Voice of the Herd’ enters 19th season at MU

    ‘Voice of the Herd’ enters 19th season at MU

    Sunday, July 27 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-27 19:00:20 GMT
    His first season as play-by-play sportscaster at Marshall University had remarkable results.
    His first season as play-by-play sportscaster at Marshall University had remarkable results.
  • College Summit marks strong decade

    College Summit marks strong decade

    Sunday, July 27 2014 11:00 AM EDT2014-07-27 15:00:13 GMT
    For more than 10 years, College Summit West Virginia has been helping make higher education more attainable for 37,000 students who have participated in the program.
    For more than 10 years, College Summit West Virginia has been helping make higher education more attainable for 37,000 students who have participated in the program.

HUNTINGTON (AP) — A Marshall University biology professor is leading an Army study of the eastern diamondback rattlesnake.

Funded by an $87,800 grant, the research will take Jayme Waldron to the Marine Corps basic training site on Parris Island in South Carolina. She and other researchers will be study the impact of military activities on the snakes.

The eastern diamondback is under review for possible protection under the Endangered Species Act. The primary reason is loss of habitat.

Waldron said the military's goal is to ensure that its habitat management practices achieve their goals while protecting the eastern diamondback.

Waldron is an assistant professor at Marshall and has spent much of her career studying snakes.

 

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.