WV Supreme Court moving in right direction - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

WV Supreme Court moving in right direction

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  • Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Friday, July 25 2014 6:00 AM EDT2014-07-25 10:00:24 GMT
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
  • Can we be realistic on roads?

    Can we be realistic on roads?

    Friday, July 18 2014 7:00 AM EDT2014-07-18 11:00:54 GMT
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.
  • Looking the other way perpetuates criminal politics

    Looking the other way perpetuates criminal politics

    Friday, July 11 2014 10:46 AM EDT2014-07-11 14:46:55 GMT
    Former Mingo County Prosecutor Michael Sparks has been sentenced to 12 months in prison for his role in a political scheme that has dominated headlines for nearly a year and shined a bright light on one part of the state’s tangled web of public corruption.
    Former Mingo County Prosecutor Michael Sparks has been sentenced to 12 months in prison for his role in a political scheme that has dominated headlines for nearly a year and shined a bright light on one part of the state’s tangled web of public corruption.

For generations, the West Virginia Supreme Court has been occupied by activist judges who put ideology and politics over fairness and equality. Decisions handed down by the court were a curious mix of peculiar legal interpretations and painfully obvious judicial activism. Fringe idealists held sway, and the more moderate voices were too-often marginalized. The end result was that no one could get a fair shot in front of the state's highest legal body.

Thankfully, that seems to be changing. The court is making some serious strides in terms of ensuring that justice is given its rightful place. It was recently announced that West Virginia Chamber of Commerce's CourtWatch panel rated a number of the court's decisions as "really good." Perhaps a more apt description would have been "really fair." It appears the court is putting the law first and grounding their interpretations in fact, not fancy, political whims or agenda-driven ideas.

All we should ask of any legal body — from the municipal court judge who deals with speeding tickets to the chief justice of the Supreme Court — is that it puts fairness and rule of law above all else. Anyone who comes before a court must know that his case will be heard and that justice will be blind.