Speed limit changes coming to Southeastern Ohio - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

Speed limit to increase on Ohio Routes 52 and 23

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GREEN TOWNSHIP, Oh. -

According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol, the speed limit on Route 52 between Ohio Furnace Road and the Scioto-Lawrence County line will go from 65 to 70 miles per hour, the highest speed allowed by the state.

From Hanging Rock to Coal Grove the speed limit is going from 55 to 60.

Many drivers don't have a problem with changes in Lawrence County.

"Anymore, 55 is too slow in most areas, especially on the highway over here," says Mike Kincaid, of Prestonsburg, KY, who says he has been cited before for speeding on Route 52. "It's all a speed trap for Hanging Rock."

As for the increase on Route 52 in Scioto County, some drivers say 65 is already too fast.

Charlotte McGlone recently drove on Interstate 64 in Kentucky.

"The speed limit's 65 and 70, and it made me real nervous," says Ms. McGlone. "With as much traffic as there is over there."

We've even spoken to some people who say 55 is a speed only a slowpoke would drive on a road like Route 52, but 70 is too much, considering that many drivers give themselves a 5 mile-per-hour curve.

"Fifty-five is too slow, and people exceed it everyday anyway," says Ironton resident, Dana Jiles, who assesses speed limits in a way that Goldilocks might assess them. "Seventy, I think is a little too fast. 65 would be great."

Nationwide, maximum speed limits go as low as 60 in Hawaii, and as high as 80 in Utah.*

By making these changes in Ohio, lawmakers say they are just keeping pace.

Another heavily traveled road, Route 23, is having its speed limit tweaked too.

On Route 23 between Lucasville and Piketon, the speed limit is going from 55 to 60.

According to dispatchers at the Highway Patrol's Scioto County post, no speed limits are being lowered, just raised.



*While its maximum speed limit is 75, Texas lawmakers have allowed for 85 mph to be the highest posted speed limit on state roads that are designed to accommodate travel at a higher speed.