Sign waving is still an effective way for candidates to "get the - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

Sign waving is still an effective way for candidates to "get the vote" out

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Candidates still feel despite living in a digital society that "sign waving" is an effective way to reach voters Candidates still feel despite living in a digital society that "sign waving" is an effective way to reach voters
CHARLESTON, WV -

As election day approaches we've seen campaign advertising all over, but there's one form of advertising where candidates feel can make the most difference, "sign waving". But the hours are long as candidates work to get those all important last minute votes. "150 hours so far," said Vic Sprouse candidate for Kanawha County Board of Education .

And "sign waving" is serious business. Candidates want to be at the right spot waving to the right people, undecided voters. And those seeking political office take this part of the process very seriously. They actually mark their spot. "I'm on Corridor G, Jefferson, St. Albans or South Charleston," said John B. McCuskey candidate for House of Delegates."Over at Lee St and Pennsylvania, over at Greenbrier and Washington," said Mike Pushkin candidate for House of Delegates.

The benefit to this type of campaigning is that is cost-effective and efficient. And with the hours candidates put in on streets interacting with potential voters it becomes a learning experience. Candidates have some pretty interesting stories to tell about the being out on the trail and "sign waving"  "I've had people lean out of their car. I've seen people texting and driving," said Sprouse. "You get the occasional not so pleasant response, but to a tee almost everyone waives and smiles and gives you a honk," said McCuskey.

All three candidates agree no matter what the response the face-to-face contact they get with voters is beneficial for themselves and the process.