Federal judge in Martinsburg, West Virginia, sends 10 to prison - WOWK 13 Charleston, Huntington WV News, Weather, Sports

Federal judge in Martinsburg, West Virginia, sends 10 to prison for violating probation

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  • Federal judge in Martinsburg, West Virginia, sends 10 to prison for violating probation

    Federal judge in Martinsburg, West Virginia, sends 10 to prison for violating probation

    Sunday, July 6 2014 11:00 AM EDT2014-07-06 15:00:12 GMT
    Nine Martinsburg, West Virginia, residents and another from Keyser were sentenced to federal prison for breaking the law while they were on supervised release or probation.
    Nine Martinsburg, West Virginia, residents and another from Keyser were sentenced to federal prison for breaking the law while they were on supervised release or probation.

Nine Martinsburg, West Virginia, residents and another from Keyser were sentenced to federal prison for breaking the law while they were on supervised release or probation, U.S. Attorney William Ihlenfeld says.

*Paul Lee Jackson, age 45, of Martinsburg, was sentenced to 37 months in prison for testing positive for the use of cocaine; failure to be truthful with probation officer; and, being charged and arrested in Berkeley County Magistrate Court for possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance. Jackson was originally sentenced in July 2003 to 240 months in prison and five years of supervised release for conspiracy to distribute cocaine base. In 2009 Jackson’s sentence was reduced to 176 months in prison and in 2011, to 128 months due to the crack resentencing guidelines.

*Gerald David Gibbs, age 26, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 24 months in prison for associating with a convicted felon; failure to notify probation officer within 72 hours of police contact; testing positive for the use of cocaine; failure to be truthful with probation officer; frequenting a location where illegal substances are located; changing address without notifying probation officer 10 days in advance; and a charge of no operator's license. Gibbs was originally sentenced in July 2010 to 60 months in prison plus four years of supervised release for the distribution of cocaine base.

*Timothy William Cook, 29, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 24 months in prison for failure to complete and submit monthly reports to the probation office; failure to respond to notifications of probation officer; and, failure to notify probation officer of a change in employment status. Cook was originally sentenced in January 2006 to 97 months in prison with three years of supervised release for possession with intent to distribute heroin.

*Brandy Netz, 39, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 18 months in prison for committing another crime of distribution of cocaine base and arranging a heroin deal. Netz was originally sentenced in August 2008 to 18 months in prison with five years of supervised release for possession with intent to distribute cocaine base.

Netz’s was sentenced to four months in prison with 18 months of supervised release after she was revoked in September 2013 for failure to be truthful with probation officer; testing positive for the use of cocaine; failure to follow instructions of the probation officer; and, being charged with other criminal violations, including failure to maintain control, failure to stop at a stop sign, destruction of property and two counts of no child restraint.

*William Matthew Redman, 47, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison and 18 months of supervised release for failure to notify probation officer of change of address; being charge in Berkeley County Magistrate Court with possession of heroin; associating with a convicted felon; possession of heroin and drug paraphernalia; and, frequenting places where controlled substances were illegally sold, distributed or administered. Redman was originally sentenced in 2003 to 151 months in prison and three years of supervised release for the distribution of cocaine base, but in 2009 his sentence was reduced to 130 months pursuant to the crack resentencing guidelines.

*Ronald Allen Brown, 36, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison for possession of drug paraphernalia; failure to respond to probation officer; and admitted use of heroin. Brown was originally sentenced in November 2004 to 108 months in prison with three years of supervised release for the distribution of heroin.

*Devonnie Joseph Cooper, 26, of Martinsburg, sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison, with three months of the imprisonment term to be served on home confinement, for admitted use of oxycodone; failure to following instructions of the probation officer; and failure to report to the probation office on six different occasions.

Cooper was originally sentenced in 2008 to 60 months in prison and four years of supervised release for possession with intent to distribute cocaine base. In 2003 Cooper’s supervised release was revoked and he was sentenced to five months in prison plus four years of supervised release for admitted use of marijuana and cocaine; testing positive for the use of marijuana; and, attempting to provide an altered/fake urine sample.

*Timothy Douglas Imperio, 33, of Keyser, West Virginia, sentenced to 12 months in prison for testing positive for the use of amphetamine, marijuana, suboxone and loracet and admitted use of xanax, none of which were prescribed to him, as well as failure to display license and no seatbelt; two charges for shoplifting; failure to notify probation officer of new charges; and charges of DUI-second offense, no proof of insurance and no operator's license.

Imperio was originally sentenced in 2009 to 30 months in prison and three years of supervised release for perjury before a grand jury, but in 2013 his supervised release was revoked and he was sentenced to six months in prison and 30 months of supervised release for failure to maintain employment; failure to notify probation officer of change in employment status; failure to file monthly report form; and, failure to be truthful with probation officer.

*Michael Hunter Norris, 37, sentenced to 10 months in prison and 100 months of supervised release for abuse of prescribed medication; failure to notify probation officer of move; and, leaving hospital without notify probation office of residential location. Norris was originally sentenced in 2012 to 15 months in prison and 10 years of supervised release for failure to register as a sex offender, but his supervised release was revoked in July 2013 and he was sentenced to five months in prison and 115 months of supervised release for testing positive and admitting to the use of marijuana as well as testing positive and denying the use of marijuana.

*Steven Blunt, 40, of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, sentenced to six months in prison and 42 months of supervised release for testing positive for the use of heroin; morphine, suboxone, opiates and methadone; being observed by probation officers with driving without a valid driver’s license; being untruthful with probation officer; and failure to complete counseling as directed. Blunt was originally sentenced in 2010 to 60 months in prison and four years of supervised release for the possession with intent to distribute heroin.

The defendants were remanded to the custody of U.S. marshals except for Imperio, who received credit for time served since June 2.

The Martinsburg revocations were handled by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jarod J. Douglas and Paul T. Camilletti.