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Election Results: WV’s unusual 2020 Primary

Your Local Election HQ

Editor’s note: Due to the heavy dependence of mail-in and absentee ballots, the final results of each race may not be known until later this week.

See 13 News’ full election coverage at Your Local Election HQ: West Virginia Primary 2020 results

CHARLESTON, WV (WOWK) – The Mountain State held its primary election today, deciding on who will face off for races including governor and who will represent West Virginia in the United States Senate.

Putnam County voters decided to allow medical cannabis organizations to operate growing facilities, processing facilities and dispensaries with approximately 64% pf the vote for each. Voters approved laboratories with almost 65%.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice (R) holds a press conference after he was projected to be the winner of the Republican nomination in today’s Primary. (13 NEWS STAFF PHOTO)

Current Gov. Jim Justice will face off against Ben Salango, the Democratic candidate for governor in the General Election after winning the Republican nomination.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (WV-R) held on to the Republican nomination for her United States Senate seat.

In a statement sent to 13 News, said the West Virginia Primary, “certainly has been unusual.”

“I am deeply honored that so many West Virginia Republicans came out and voted for me and asked to send me back to the United States Senate for another term,” she said. “I’m working hard on economic development issues as we reopen from this COVID pandemic. I have been very mindful to make sure that West Virginia is a part of both the health and economic circumstances that we found ourselves in. And I’m ready for our economy to get going, moving and growing so that we can take off where we left off.”

She will face off with Paula Jean Swearengin, who took the Democratic primary.

In a statement sent to 13 News, Swearengin said although one person or election will not solve the systemic injustices that plague our society alone, together, West Virginians can stand in solidarity with the cause.

“When we unite our fight for justice, we can accomplish our goals,” she said. “We can end systemic racism. We can guarantee healthcare as a human right. We can ensure every person has clean air to breathe and clean water to drink.”

As expected President Donald Trump and Joe Biden received West Virginia’s nods for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations. Biden officially took the Democratic nomination earlier this week.

UNCONTESTED RACES

Uncontested candidates include David McKinley(R) – U.S. House – District 1; Cathy Kunkel(D) – U.S. House – District 2 (D)

Natalie Tennant (D) – Secretary of State, Mac Warner (i), (R) – Secretary of State; Mary Ann Claytor (D) – Auditor; John McCuskey (i), (R) – Auditor; John Perdue (i), (D) – Treasurer; Riley Moore, (R) – Treasurer; Patrick Morrisey (i), (R) – Attorney General;

Randy Swartzmiller (D) – State Senate – District 1; Robert Wilson (D) – State Senate – District 3; Donna Boley (i), (R) – State Senate – District 3; Bruce Ashworth (D) – State Senate – District 4; Robert Plymale (i), (D) – State Senate – District 5; Ralph Rodighiero (D) – State Senate – District 7; Rupie Phillips (R) – State Senate – District 7; Glenn Jeffries (i), (D) – Senate – District 8; Kathie Crouse (R) – State Senate – District 8; William Laird (D) – State Senate – District 10; Denise Campbell (D) – State Senate – District 11; Doug Facemire (i), (D) – State Senate – District 12; Mike Caputo (D) – State Senate – District 13; David Childers (D) – State Senate – District 14; Randy Smith (i), (R) – State Senate – District 14; Pete Dougherty (D) – State Senate – District 16; Patricia Rucker (i), (R) – State Senate – District 16; Eric Nelson (R) – State Senate – District 17;

Pat McGeehan (i), (R), Mark Zatezalo, (R) – House of Delegates – District 1; Phillip Diserio (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 2; Gordon Greer (R) – House of Delegates – District 2; Shawn Fluharty (i), (D), Benjamin Schneider, (D) – House of Delegates – District 3; Dalton Haas (R), Erikka Storch (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 3; Christian Turak (D), Lisa Zukoff (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 4; Charlie Reynolds (R) – House of Delegates – District 4; Dave Pethtel (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 5; Phillip Wiley (R) – House of Delegates – District 5; David Kelly (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 6; Andrew Alvarez (D) – House of Delegates – District 8; Bill Anderson (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 8; Jim Marion (D) – House of Delegates – District 9; Trish Pritchard (D), Luke Winters (D) – House of Delegates – District 10; Mark Pauley (D) – House of Delegates – District 11; Steve Westfall (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 12; Scott Brewer (D), David Caldwell (D) – House of Delegates – District 13;  Theresa Jackson (D) – House of Delegates – District 15; Geoff Foster (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 15; Chad Lovejoy (i), (D), Jeanette Rowsey (D) – House of Delegates – District 17; Matthew Rohrbach (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 17; Paul Ross (D) – House of Delegates – District 18; Evan Worrell (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 18;

Nathan Brown (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 20; Matthew Deskins (R) – House of Delegates – District 20; Phyllis White (D) – House of Delegates – District 21; Mark Dean (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 21; Jeff Eldridge (D), Cecil Silva (D) – House of Delegates – District 22; Rodney Miller (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 23; Josh Holstein (R) – House of Delegates – District 23; Jordan Bridges (R), Margitta Mazzocchi, (R) – House of Delegates – District 24; Tony Paynter (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 25; Ed Evans (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 26; Wesley Payne (R) – House of Delegates – District 26; Tina Russell (D) – House of Delegates – District 27; Ryne Nahodil (D) – House of Delegates – District 28; Roy Cooper (i), (R), Jeffrey Pack (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 28; Xavier Oglesby (D) – House of Delegates – District 29; Brandon Steele (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 29; Mick Bates (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 30; Tyler Trump (R) – House of Delegates – District 30; Mick Bates (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 30; Tyler Trump (R) – House of Delegates – District 30; Larry Cottrell (D) – House of Delegates – District 33; Roger Hanshaw (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 33;
Brent Boggs (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 34; Mike Pushkin (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 37; Dianna Graves (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 38; David Holmes (D) – House of Delegates – District 39;

Dean Jeffries (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 40; Duane Bragg (D) – House of Delegates – District 41; Heather Tully (R) – House of Delegates – District 41; Jeff Campbell (i), (D), Cindy Lavender-Bowe (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 42; Barry Bruce (R), Todd Longanacre (R) – House of Delegates – District 42; William Nestor (R), Mark Rennix (R) – House of Delegates – District 43; Robin Cutlip, (D) – House of Delegates – District 44; Caleb Hanna (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 44; Ed Larry (D) – House of Delegates – District 47; Chris Phillips (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 47; Steve Hamilton (Mnt) – House of Delegates – District 48; Amy Summers (i),(R) – House of Delegates – District 49; Phil Mallow (R), Darton McIntire (R), Guy Ward (R) – House of Delegates – District 50; Cindy Frich (R), Zach Lemaire (R), Todd Stainbrook (R), Joe Statler (R), Justin White (R) – House of Delegates – District 51; Junior Wolfe (D) – House of Delegates – District 52; D.R. Jennings (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 53; John Hott (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 54; Bryan Ward (R) – House of Delegates – District 55; Gary Howell (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 56; Ruth Rowan (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 57; Tom Harden (D) – House of Delegates – District 58;

Brad Noll (D) – House of Delegates – District 60; Don Forsht (R) – House of Delegates – District 60;  
Jason Barrett (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 61; Kim Mongan-Saladini (R) – House of Delegates – District 61; Debi Carroll (D) – House of Delegates – District 62; Daniel Bennett (D) – House of Delegates – District 63; John Hardy (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 63; Eric Householder (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 64; Sammi Brown (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 65; Wayne Clark (R) – House of Delegates – District 65; Storme Frame (D) – House of Delegates – District 66; Paul Espinosa (i), (R) – House of Delegates – District 66; John Doyle (i), (D) – House of Delegates – District 67; Mark Everhart (R) – House of Delegates – District 67

THE 2020 PRIMARY ELECTION

This primary election proved to be unusual due to the coronavirus pandemic. Justice moved the election’s date from May 12 after asking West Virginians to vote via absentee ballot. A move criticized by many Republican leaders, including President Donald Trump.

After many of the Democratic leaders pushed back at Trump, defending mail-in voting as a necessary safety measure, Trump continued to criticize proponents of mail-in voting. Even going as far as Tweeting what some described as a threat to Michigan, saying COVID-19 relief money could be withheld after he said the state had sent absentee ballots to millions of voters.

“Michigan sends absentee ballots to 7.7 million people ahead of Primaries and the General Election,” Trump tweeted Wednesday. “This was done illegally and without authorization by a rogue Secretary of State. I will ask to hold up funding to Michigan if they want to go down this Voter Fraud path!”

It was later revealed Michigan mailed absentee ballot applications to the state’s registered voters. State officials said they did not mail the ballots themselves.

Trump later Tweeted a similar thought to Democratic run Nevada.

Although West Virginia leaders managed to stay above the fray in this debate, Republican Secretary of State Mac Warner mailed postcards to all 1.2 million registered voters in the state, asking if they would like to vote by mail.

“You send that back in and then the clerk will send a ballot to you, and you vote your ballot. And we are encouraging people to vote early, to get on with this process. There’s no reason to wait until Election Day,” he said.

This year was also the first year state officials allowed some disabled West Virginians to vote via mobile devices as the Mountain State does for military personnel serving overseas.

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