Avocados can change belly fat distribution in women, Study finds

Health

Hass avocados in Los Angeles, California on January 22, 2015. The avocado has become the United States new favorite fruit with more than 4.25 billion sold last year. The Hass variety make up 95% of all avocados eaten in the United States and 85% of avocados are imported, mainly from Mexico. AFP PHOTO/MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)

(WTRF) An avocado a day can change how belly fat in women is redistributed and can lead toward a healthier profile, according to a new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

The study consisted of one hundred and five adults with overweight and obesity. The participants were divided into two groups. One group received meals that incorporated a fresh avocado and the other group received the same meals but without an avocado.

The study found that women who consumed avocado as part of their daily meals had a reduction in deeper visceral abdominal fat.

Nainab Khan, an Illinois professor led the study and said, “The goal wasn’t weight loss; we were interested in understanding what eating an avocado does to the way individuals store their body fat. The location of fat in the body plays an important role in health.”

“In the abdomen, there are two kinds of fat: fat that accumulates right underneath the skin, called subcutaneous fat, and fat that accumulates deeper in the abdomen, known as visceral fat, that surrounds the internal organs. Individuals with a higher proportion of that deeper visceral fat tend to be at a higher risk of developing diabetes. So we were interested in determining whether the ratio of subcutaneous to visceral fat changed with avocado consumption,” he said.

Female participants who consumed an avocado a day as part of their meal had a reduction in visceral abdominal fat – the hard-to-target fat associated with higher risk – and experienced a reduction in the ratio of visceral fat to subcutaneous fat, indicating a redistribution of fat away from the organs. However, fat distribution in males did not change, and neither males nor females had improvements in glucose tolerance.

“While daily consumption of avocados did not change glucose tolerance, what we learned is that a dietary pattern that includes an avocado every day impacted the way individuals store body fat in a beneficial manner for their health, but the benefits were primarily in females,” Khan said. “It’s important to demonstrate that dietary interventions can modulate fat distribution. Learning that the benefits were only evident in females tells us a little bit about the potential for sex playing a role in dietary intervention responses.”

The researchers said they hope to conduct a follow-up study that would provide participants with all their daily meals and look at additional markers of gut health and physical health to get a more complete picture

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