Teens love the video app TikTok. Do they love it too much?

US & World

This Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. From the perspective of teens flooding onto TikTok, the Chinese-owned online video app is a major new outlet for self-expression, one proudly home to the silly, the loud and the weird. To others, though, the service is an unnerving black box that could be sharing information with the Chinese government, facilitating espionage, or just promoting videos and songs some parents consider lewd. (AP Photo)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) – TikTok is a major new outlet for self-expression, one proudly home to the silly, the loud and the weird.

The service lets users – many of them kids or young adults – create and share short videos, many no longer than 15 seconds.

To many, what’s special is TikTok’s goofiness and sense of genuine fun.

But to others, the Chinese-owned online video service is an unnerving black box that could be sharing information with the Chinese government, facilitating espionage, or just promoting videos and songs some parents consider lewd.

TikTok denies the first two concerns and says it’s working on the third.

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