Remains of WV soldier killed in Korean War will be laid to rest

West Virginia

UPDATE (11:40 a.m. on Tuesday, August 3): The Jackson County Sheriff’s Department is asking for the community’s support in welcoming home the remains of a U.S. soldier killed in the Korean War.

The remains of Army Cpl. Pete W. Conley will arrive in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday evening and will be transported to Chapmanville, West Virginia.

Local sheriff’s offices are asking folks to gather at Ritchie Bridge in Ravenswood, West Virginia at 9:00 p.m. to give Cpl. Conley a true hero’s welcome.


FORT KNOX, KY (WOWK)—According to the U.S. Army Human Resources Command Public Affairs Office, the remains of a West Virginia soldier killed during the Korean War will be interred at Forest Lawn Cemetary on August 6.

Funeral services for Chapmanville native, Army Cpl. Pete W. Conley will be performed by Evans Funeral Home in Chapmanville, West Virginia.

Conley was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division and was reported missing in action on December 12, 1950 following an enemy attack on his unit near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. His remains could not be recovered after the battle. He was only 19 years old.

On July 27, 2018, almost 70 years later, North Korea turned over Conley’s remains, and he was accounted for by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on June 5, 2020 once his remains were identified using circumstantial evidence and anthropological, mitochondrial DNA,  and autosomal DNA analysis.

Along with others still missing from the Korean War, Conley’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. To indicate that he has been accounted for, a rosette will be placed next to his name.

More than 7,500 Americans are still unaccounted for from the Korean War.

Almost seventy years later, Conley’s remains were turned over by North Korea on July 27, 2018. He was accounted for by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on June 5, 2020, after his remains were identified using circumstantial evidence and anthropological, mitochondrial DNA,  and autosomal DNA analysis.

Conley’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

More than 7,500 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

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