U.S. Supreme Court upholds Affordable Care Act, dismisses Texas challenge

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FILE – In this Nov. 5, 2020, file photo the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. With abortion and guns already on the agenda, the conservative-dominated Supreme Court is considering adding a third blockbuster issue _ whether to ban consideration of race in college admissions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

WASHINGTON (AP/WOWK) – The Supreme Court has dismissed a challenge to the Obama era health care law, preserving insurance coverage for millions of Americans.

The justices left the entire law intact Thursday in ruling that Texas, other Republican-led states and two individuals had no right to bring their lawsuit in federal court.

The law’s major provisions include protections for people with pre-existing health conditions, a range of no-cost preventive services and the expansion of the Medicaid program that insures lower-income people, including those who work in jobs that don’t pay much or provide health insurance.

Also left in place is the law’s now-toothless requirement that people have health insurance or pay a penalty. Congress rendered that provision irrelevant in 2017 when it reduced the penalty to zero.

Reacting to the announcement, Ohio Attorney General David Yost applauded the decision saying “Ohio went to the Supreme Court to Protect Ohioans with pre-existing conditions – people who would have lost legal protection if the trial court’s decision had been affirmed.”

“Ohio went to the Supreme Court to protect Ohioans with pre-existing conditions – people who would have lost legal protection if the trial court’s decision had been affirmed.

“Ohio went to the Supreme Court to protect Ohioans with pre-existing conditions – people who would have lost legal protection if the trial court’s decision had not ben affirmed. This lawsuit was an invitation to judicial activism from the start, and while SCOTUS never reached the constitutional issues, I am happy that its decision did no harm to our people.”

David Yost – (D) Ohio Attorney General

From the other perspective, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morissey expressed disappointment.

“We are deeply disappointed that the court ducked the question about the unconstitutionality of the individual mandate. This case was always about: one, ensuring that individuals could not be coerced into purchasing health insurance against their will; and, two, making the insurance system far more affordable for hard-working Americans. Too many West Virginians have suffered from skyrocketing premiums and need better, more affordable health care options. We will keep fighting for affordable coverage and against coercive, individual mandates that represent the opposite of freedom.”

Patrick Morissey – (R) West Virginia Attorney General

“Too many West Virginians have suffered from skyrocketing premiums and need better, more affordable health care options,” he said. “We will keep fighting for affordable coverage and against coercive, individual mandates that represent the opposite of freedom.”

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